Posts tagged ‘bottle bill’

Safeway Recycling Center Eviction Update

by Ed Dunn

Unbelievable.

Not only is Safeway turning its back on recycling, but now the San Francisco Chronicle is too. The Chronicle ran an editorial today against the California Redemption Value law. That, of course, is the law that governs California’s overwhelmingly successful bottle and can deposit program, which has pushed California to a 84% recycling rate.

You already know how important recycling centers are for the environment and that curbside recycling is not enough. You already know that this anti-recycling center campaign is more about property values rather than California Redemption Value.

Please help me spread the word by sending the petition link on to your friends.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/save-san-francisco-recycling?mailing_id=16437&source=s.icn.em.cr&r_by=8796558

And contact Safeway :

Safeway Corporate Headquarters
5918 Stoneridge Mall Road
Pleasanton, CA 94588
925-467-3000

TAKE ACTION!
Send an aluminum can to the Chronicle.  Just flatten it,  put into an envelope with a first class stamp and address it to :

San Francisco Chronicle
901 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

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Rally to Keep Recycling in SF!

RALLY: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, NOON, CITY HALL STEPS

Sponsored by: Haight Ashbury Neighborhood Council

RallyRecycling

ATTENTION: Small Business Owners, Community Gardeners, Urban Agriculture Activists, Chinese Community Representatives, HANC Recycling and Kezar Gardens Center Advocates and others with a vested stake in Zero Waste, Small Business, Urban Agriculture, and Environmental Legacy in San Francisco.

Bring your support to the steps of City Hall this Tuesday and demand that Mayor Lee take responsibility for the negative impacts set to occur once Haight Ashbury Recycling center is evicted.   We need people, signs, and voices to be heard to achieve the following goals.

  • Retain HANC recycling and Kezar Gardens Center within the Convenience Zone it serves
  • Issue a Hold on Eviction until a Task Force can determine best course of action for all parties
  • Prevent Small Business from Footing the Bill for NIMBY politics
  • Preserve the sustainable economic model: recycling = green jobs + native plants + community gardens in one space
  • Preserve 51 community garden beds and their 100 gardeners
  • Create a task force to find a suitable location to house this important ecology center
  • Reinstate the citizen advisory board to advise Recreation and Park on plans to build a new garden with taxpayer money.

We gather to call attention to a mounting crisis for San Francisco small businesses, consumers and gardens alike. The system for taking back bottles and cans for California Redemption Value (CRV) is broken and may be on the verge of collapse.

The California State Bottle bill requires small markets in the City to accept recycling (bottles and cans) in store if there is no supermarket or recycling center nearby. Stores of any size may opt out of this requirement by paying a $100 a day in lieu fee. While this may not be much for a large grocery store, smaller establishments will be hard pressed to pay it.

Impacts on Small Grocers [or Markets] and Beverage Stores

  • All small stores that sell beverage containers with a CRV deposit must also take those containers back
  • If there is a recycling center nearby or a larger grocery store with recycling services, the store becomes exempt.
  • When HANC recycling and Kezar Gardens closes, there will be no recycling in the area
  • Big Business (Whole Foods) will afford the fee and small business will have to pay up or accept recycling in their stores.
  • The fee is $100/day and up to $36K per year.

Need for Recycling Centers

  • The Small Business Commission is holding hearings to discuss the shortage of recycling in the city now
  • Suspending recycling services in the area will have a negative impact on recycling rates-50% of recycling in SF goes through a recycling center
  • Without a local recycling center, all small businesses will pay high fees or have to accept recycling in store

The existing recycling centers in SF are well utilized but dwindling in numbers. Numbering 30 in 1990, now there are only 21. Statewide, there is one recycling center for every 18,000 residents while there is only one for every 38,000 San Franciscans. Recycling centers in the City receive half of all CRV bottles and cans recycled.

Of the 21 recycling centers in the City, only about 12 are conveniently located at neighborhood supermarkets or nearby. The rest are hard to get to or only consist of reverse vending machines that slowly receive bottles and cans one at a time. As a result long lines are the norm at most City recycling centers.

The City’s eviction of HANC sets a terrible example for supermarkets. HANC has served the Inner Richmond, Inner Sunset and Haight-Ashbury Bottle Bill requirements since the law went into effect in 1987. Other recycling centers are rumored for shut down in the near future, following the lead of the City. The HANC eviction will have a domino effect leaving thousands of San Franciscans and hundreds of stores without a place to recycle.

The Mayor needs to address this crisis now by placing the HANC eviction on hold while a task force is appointed to develop and implement solutions.

HANC recycling has also been a longtime advocate for urban agriculture and habitat restoration.  The money that is generated from recycling pays for green jobs with health insurance as well as a decade old San Francisco Native Plant Nursery.  When HANC learned of the plan to create a community garden in the space, it immediately met the need creating Kezar Gardens, a 51-plot community garden program.  There are currently 100 gardeners who will lose their plots in the event of an eviction.  The Recreation and Park Department has no plan to retain or relocate those gardens or those gardeners.  We demand that the citizen advisory council that was created to advise Recreation and Park on the use of the space be reinstated.  This group should be tasked with the fate of the current gardeners, if they cannot be relocated elsewhere.

There is no other model in the city of San Francisco that demonstrates how recycling contributes to jobs that restore the earth and community programs that educate, celebrate and nurture organic food growth, community health, and an integrated approach to taking environmental action in one half acre of land.

Celsius&Beyond

Things U Shouldn’t Say to a Reverse Vending Machine

7TH AND CABRILLO

There is a new game in town on the recycling front.  At the Inner Richmond Safeway, near Golden Gate Park, at 7th Avenue and Cabrillo Street, the reverse vending machine is being tested out.  This machine was once proposed to be a replacement for places like community recycling centers and it was said that dozens of these types of machines could do what community recycling at Kezar does.  However, upon observation, there are many things this machine does not have to offer.

THE ONLYS

The reverse vending machine ONLY takes CRV (cash redemption) containers, and nothing too big, please.

ONLY one container can be inserted at a time.

The machine will not accept crushed cans or bottles (KEZAR does).  On my last visit, I saw a homeless woman try to recycle her large bag of goods, only to walk away with half the bag rejected after trying for 40 minutes.

Do not try to recycled mixed paper, cardboard, or any oversized items at the machine.

There is no compost or garden like component at the machine.

The machine is ONLY for particular, well kept, bottles and cans, that have a CRV deposit.  No milk jugs, no wine bottles, no tin foil, no, no, no, no.

PART OF A WHOLE

Reverse vending seems like it would be a great service for people who don’t have a lot to recycle and can build it into their regular shopping at Safeway.  People with large amounts of CRV or a variety of recycling needs will find long waits at the machine and, often, that it does not serve the entirity of their needs or even gives them credit for all their stuff.  As part of a whole, the reverse vending machine seems complimentary to community recycling and curbside service, but is hardly a stand alone system.